FDA issues safety communication on HeartStart automated external defibrillators

247

Certain HeartStart automated external defibrillator (AED) devices made by Philips Healthcare may be unable to deliver needed defibrillator shock in a cardiac emergency situation, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has announced.

The safety communication includes recommendations to better inspect and monitor the readiness of these devices, as well as steps to follow if someone must use a recalled device in an emergency situation.

“The FDA advises keeping all recalled HeartStart AEDs in service until you obtain a replacement from Philips Healthcare or another AED manufacturer, even if the device indicates it has detected an error during a self-test,” said Steve Silverman, director of the Office of Compliance in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “Despite current manufacturing and performance problems, the FDA considers the benefits of attempting to use an AED in a cardiac arrest emergency greater than the risk of not attempting to use the defibrillator.”


These devices were manufactured and distributed between 2005 and 2012 under the names HeartStart FRx, HeartStart HS1 Home, and HeartStart HS1 OnSite. Users should contact Philips Healthcare immediately for a replacement AED unit, states the report.


In September 2012, Philips Healthcare initiated the recall of HeartStart FRx, HeartStart HS1 Home, and HeartStart HS1 OnSite AEDs due to the failure of an internal electrical component. The recall affected approximately 700,000 devices. In a Medical Device Safety Notice dated 19 November 2013, Philips provided consumers with updated information about the failure of an internal electrical component that could cause the AEDs to fail to deliver a shock. The notification also directed users to a Maintenance Advisory.


The FDA will continue to closely monitor all AED manufacturers’ quality system practices and manufacturing changes that have persistently contributed to recall and adverse events associated with AEDs, says the FDA.


In March 2013, the FDA issued a proposed order that if finalised would require manufacturers of AEDs and accessories to submit premarket approval applications that focus specifically on the critical requirements necessary to assure AEDs are safe and effective. The main objective of this proposed regulatory approach is to improve the reliability of AEDs so that they can continue to save lives.


The FDA advices users in the USA who suspect that an AED has malfunctioned to file a voluntary report through MedWatch, the FDA Safety Information and Adverse Event Reporting programme.

(Visited 42 times, 1 visits today)