Remede implantable device system shows “promising” results in the treatment of central sleep apnoea, pilot study shows

278

Patients with central sleep apnoea, treated with the remede system (Respicardia), experienced a 50% decrease in apnoea-hypopnea index, improved oxygenation by over 50%, decreased arousals and improved quality of life, according to results of the remede system pilot study presented by William T Abraham (The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, USA) at a late-breaking scientific session of the 17th Heart Failure Society of America meeting (HFSA, Orlando, USA, 22–25 September).

Implanted by electrophysiologists using a procedure similar to the implantation of intracardiac devices, the remede system is designed to restore normal sleep and breathing to improve respiratory and cardiovascular health in patients with central sleep apnoea. In the prospective, multicentre, global trial, a total of 44 central sleep apnoea patients were implanted with the system and completed six months of follow-up. Patients experienced a greater than 50% decrease in apnoea-hypopnea index, improved oxygenation by over 50%, decreased arousals and improved quality of life.

“I am impressed by the clinically meaningful results of the remede system,” said Abraham, co-principal investigator of the remede system pilot study. “The remede system which provides a safe and innovative therapy shows promise for the treatment of central sleep apnoea and is being studied further in the pivotal trial.”


Central sleep apnoea is associated with increased mortality and hospitalisation in heart failure patients. Studies show that central sleep apnoea affects up to 40% of heart failure patients and 30% of atrial fibrillation patients.

The remedy system received the CE mark in August 2010.


About the rem
ede system


The remede system is an implantable pacemaker-like device that was designed for improved respiratory rhythm management. The remede system delivers electrical pulses via an implantable lead to one of the body’s two phrenic nerves. The diaphragm responds by restoring a more natural, less disrupted, breathing pattern.

(Visited 59 times, 1 visits today)